Begin the new year with a Yoga Teacher Training in Paris

Photo: Centre de Yoga du Marais

Photo: Centre de Yoga du Marais

You don’t have to travel to India or Bali to become a yoga teacher. (Although if that’s what you really want to do, follow your bliss.) You can deepen your knowledge and learn to become a teacher without leaving Paris, studying with wise and passionate instructors who have spent years developing their own practices and cultivating an extended family of enthusiastic students.

In January alone, there are three trainings kicking off: one with Michelle Jacobi of Centre de Yoga du Marais (taught in English and French); another with Renan de Germain of Osmose Yoga Paris (in French); and an Iyengar-focused one with Céline Miconnet of Himayoga (also in French.) Two of the trainings are Yoga Alliance certified, while the other is certified by IFAREN. There are other differences, of course, as each program reflects the experiences and interests of each teacher. And this is just for the month of January! There are sure to be more trainings as 2014 unfolds…

So, how do you choose the right Teacher Training? What should you look for? How advanced do you have to be as a student? Recently a Yogateau user asked us these kinds of questions, and we distilled our advice into one answer:

Find the teacher first, then the training.

Generally speaking, coursework, practical and pedagogical exercises, asana, meditation, anatomy and physiology do not vary all that much between Teacher Trainings. There are, naturally, nuances in approach, philosophy and alignment, but the core of what you learn in a Teacher Training is: how to get students to move their bodies into poses safely, how to give clear verbal cues, how to adjust without causing injury, how to design an effective sequence, etc. The real difference—the one that has the biggest impact on your future as a teacher—is your Teacher Training TEACHER. You want to learn from someone who makes your heart sing, a teacher who inspires you and brings out your best, someone who knows your practice and makes you excited to be a student.

Photo: Himayoga

Photo: Himayoga

This may be our own bias, but we really think it is key to train with someone you study with ALL THE TIME. The teacher whose classes you take regularly? Wait for that teacher to lead a training. If that means you have to wait, then wait. Be patient so that you can study with someone who has spent time nurturing—and being accountable to—you and your community. This is a teacher who will be as invested in your success as you are.